Iceland

beyond the beaten path

Iceland is a stunningly beautiful place if you enjoy strange and desolate landscapes. The amount of daylight varies dramatically by season. The sun sets briefly each night in June, but the sky doesn't get fully dark before the next sunrise. If you visit in the winter, you'll experience nearly 20 hours of darkness, but with mesmerizing views of the Norther Lights. Early or late winter can be surprisingly good times to visit. In late January, daylight is from about 10:00-17:00, prices are lower than in the high season, and the snow-blanketed landscape is eerily beautiful. (Some sites are, however, inaccessible in the winter). Despite its name, Iceland has surprisingly mild winters for a country at that latitude owing to the warming effect of the Atlantic Gulf Stream. Iceland enjoys a maritime temperate climate and the average temperature in winter is around 0°C, although the wind chill makes it feel a lot colder. The rapidly changing weather has given rise to the local saying: 'If you don't like the weather, wait five minutes!' It's the kind of place where it's not unusual to get rained on and sunburned at the same time. The summers are cooler and more temperate than elsewhere at the same latitude and the temperature rarely exceeds 20°C.Iceland is a stunningly beautiful place if you enjoy strange and desolate landscapes. The amount of daylight varies dramatically by season. The sun sets briefly each night in June, but the sky doesn't get fully dark before the next sunrise. If you visit in the winter, you'll experience nearly 20 hours of darkness, but with mesmerizing views of the Norther Lights. Early or late winter can be surprisingly good times to visit. In late January, daylight is from about 10:00-17:00, prices are lower than in the high season, and the snow-blanketed landscape is eerily beautiful. (Some sites are, however, inaccessible in the winter). Despite its name, Iceland has surprisingly mild winters for a country at that latitude owing to the warming effect of the Atlantic Gulf Stream. Iceland enjoys a maritime temperate climate and the average temperature in winter is around 0°C, although the wind chill makes it feel a lot colder. The rapidly changing weather has given rise to the local saying: 'If you don't like the weather, wait five minutes!' It's the kind of place where it's not unusual to get rained on and sunburned at the same time. The summers are cooler and more temperate than elsewhere at the same latitude and the temperature rarely exceeds 20°C.Iceland is a stunningly beautiful place if you enjoy strange and desolate landscapes. The amount of daylight varies dramatically by season. The sun sets briefly each night in June, but the sky doesn't get fully dark before the next sunrise. If you visit in the winter, you'll experience nearly 20 hours of darkness, but with mesmerizing views of the Norther Lights. Early or late winter can be surprisingly good times to visit. In late January, daylight is from about 10:00-17:00, prices are lower than in the high season, and the snow-blanketed landscape is eerily beautiful. (Some sites are, however, inaccessible in the winter). Despite its name, Iceland has surprisingly mild winters for a country at that latitude owing to the warming effect of the Atlantic Gulf Stream. Iceland enjoys a maritime temperate climate and the average temperature in winter is around 0°C, although the wind chill makes it feel a lot colder. The rapidly changing weather has given rise to the local saying: 'If you don't like the weather, wait five minutes!' It's the kind of place where it's not unusual to get rained on and sunburned at the same time. The summers are cooler and more temperate than elsewhere at the same latitude and the temperature rarely exceeds 20°C.

Vik, Icelandby Luke Stackpoole
Vik, Icelandby Luke Stackpoole